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Image of As America's First Ladies become better known and their influence and accomplishments become more widely recognized, interest in and fascination with the women themselves increases. 'Homes of the First Ladies' is a guide to places that commemorate and interpret the lives and legacies of these First Ladies. This book provides short biographical sketches of all of the First Ladies, including those wives of presidents who died before their husbands were elected to that high office, then identifies, describes, and provides access information to some fifty-eight sites where wives of presidents once lived or are otherwise commemorated. Many of the sites described in this book are those that the women shared with their husbands, but increasingly homes and other structures in which these women lived during childhood or before marrying are being preserved in recognition or thier historical value and the rich legacies of the First Ladies themselves.

Visits to the homes and museums described in this book will afford curious travelers the opportunity to experience some of the most intimate personal spaces, material possessions, and creativity that influenced, shaped, and gave voice to that small but very special group of women whose husbands happened to have been elected President of the United States.

Upon retiring from a career in the advertising and broadcasting industry, William G. Clotworthy turned to finding, describing, and teaching about places that commemorate presidents of the United States. The release of 'Homes of the First Ladies,' Clotworthy's fourth book dealing with presidential and related sites, reflects the public's great and growing interest in the women that have accompanied, and often sudstantially influenced, the careers and legacies of American presidents. - Book

As America's First Ladies become better known and their influence and accomplishments become more widely recognized, interest in and fascination with the women themselves increases. 'Homes of the First Ladies' is a guide to places that commemorate and interpret the lives and legacies of these First Ladies. This book provides short biographical sketches of all of the First Ladies, including those wives of presidents who died before their husbands were elected to that high office, then identifies, describes, and provides access information to some fifty-eight sites where wives of presidents once lived or are otherwise commemorated. Many of the sites described in this book are those that the women shared with their husbands, but increasingly homes and other structures in which these women lived during childhood or before marrying are being preserved in recognition or thier historical value and the rich legacies of the First Ladies themselves. Visits to the homes and museums described in this book will afford curious travelers the opportunity to experience some of the most intimate personal spaces, material possessions, and creativity that influenced, shaped, and gave voice to that small but very special group of women whose husbands happened to have been elected President of the United States. Upon retiring from a career in the advertising and broadcasting industry, William G. Clotworthy turned to finding, describing, and teaching about places that commemorate presidents of the United States. The release of 'Homes of the First Ladies,' Clotworthy's fourth book dealing with presidential and related sites, reflects the public's great and growing interest in the women that have accompanied, and often sudstantially influenced, the careers and legacies of American presidents. - Book

Object Type: Library

Image of William McKinley's election in 1896 was a breakthrough. It marked the first time in two decades that the Republican party was able to solidify its majority, putting GOP in a position to dominate American politics for a generation. Meanwhile, the presidency had been declining in prestige and power, and McKinley's election restored it to prominece.

In the century since his death, McKinley's accomplishments have been eclisped by the charisma and public appeal of his vice president and successor, Theodore Roosevelt. But, as Kevin Phillips explains, McKinley was a major American president, deserving admission to the second teir, the capable performers below the lofty level of Washington, Lincoln, and FDR. He is among the sixteen U.S. presidents elected to two terms, and he avoided the tarnish of major scandal. It was during his administration that the United States made its diplomatic and military debut as a world power, partly through McKinley's shrewd prosecution of the Spanish-
American War. McKinley is one of eight presidents who, either in the White House or on the battlefield, led the nation in successful wars; more important, he is among the six or seven whose election led to a major realignment of the U.S. party system.

Phillips, the author of 'Wealth and Democracy' and 'The Cousins' Wars,' has long been fascinated with McKinley and the Republican party's cycles of power. He explains that McKinley's lackluster rating have been sustained not by unjust biographers, but by a legacy of unfair criticism about his personality, his indirect style of governing, his Victorian middle-class demeanor, and his inability to inspire the American public. In this powerful reexamination of McKinley's life and presidency, Phillips argues convincingly that McKinley's accomplishments qualify him for promotion into the ranks of the near-great chief executives. - Book

William McKinley's election in 1896 was a breakthrough. It marked the first time in two decades that the Republican party was able to solidify its majority, putting GOP in a position to dominate American politics for a generation. Meanwhile, the presidency had been declining in prestige and power, and McKinley's election restored it to prominece. In the century since his death, McKinley's accomplishments have been eclisped by the charisma and public appeal of his vice president and successor, Theodore Roosevelt. But, as Kevin Phillips explains, McKinley was a major American president, deserving admission to the second teir, the capable performers below the lofty level of Washington, Lincoln, and FDR. He is among the sixteen U.S. presidents elected to two terms, and he avoided the tarnish of major scandal. It was during his administration that the United States made its diplomatic and military debut as a world power, partly through McKinley's shrewd prosecution of the Spanish- American War. McKinley is one of eight presidents who, either in the White House or on the battlefield, led the nation in successful wars; more important, he is among the six or seven whose election led to a major realignment of the U.S. party system. Phillips, the author of 'Wealth and Democracy' and 'The Cousins' Wars,' has long been fascinated with McKinley and the Republican party's cycles of power. He explains that McKinley's lackluster rating have been sustained not by unjust biographers, but by a legacy of unfair criticism about his personality, his indirect style of governing, his Victorian middle-class demeanor, and his inability to inspire the American public. In this powerful reexamination of McKinley's life and presidency, Phillips argues convincingly that McKinley's accomplishments qualify him for promotion into the ranks of the near-great chief executives. - Book

Object Type: Library